Triangulation Chess Tactic

Triangulation is a chess tactic that is used to gain a tempo by moving the king to a different square and then back to its original position. This tactic is often used to gain a tempo in endgame positions, where every move counts and can make a difference in the outcome of the game.

The idea behind triangulation is to create a zig-zag pattern with the king, allowing the player to gain a tempo by moving the king to a different square and then back to its original position, while also avoiding any checks or captures from the opponent. For example, if a king is on a square where it can be captured by a rook, the player can move the king to a safe square and then back to its original position, gaining a tempo in the process.

Triangulation can also be used to gain a tempo in positions where a player is trying to win a pawn or create a passed pawn. By moving the king to a different square and then back to its original position, the player can gain a tempo and create a passed pawn, which can be a decisive factor in the endgame.

Another use of triangulation is to gain a tempo in the endgame by moving the king to a different square and then back to its original position, while also avoiding any checks or captures from the opponent. For example, if a king is on a square where it can be captured by a rook, the player can move the king to a safe square and then back to its original position, gaining a tempo in the process.

Triangulation was first used in the 19th century by players like Paul Morphy, Wilhelm Steinitz and José Raul Capablanca. They were known for their exceptional endgame skills, and the use of triangulation was one of the key elements that set them apart from other players.

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